Discussion:
CIA clandestine operators are getting nervous about the net of secret prisions..
(demasiado antiguo para responder)
PM
2005-11-18 15:18:00 UTC
Permalink
Titulares Cadena Global

Elecciones 4D


-Directivos de medios preocupados por "ambiente electoral"

-Gobierno ofreció apoyo a la misión de observadores de la OEA


Nacionales


-Globovisión demostrará infamia contra Mezerhane

-Fue diferida hasta el 22 audiencia de hermanos Guevara

-Tribunal noveno reiniciará juicio a Carlos Ortega el martes

-Fiscal ordena investigar supuesta reunión de soborno a jueza

-Defensa de Ibéyise Pacheco: se están desconociendo normas

-Defensoría del Pueblo visitó a Mezherane y a Moreno Palmar

-Interponen querella contra Mildred Camero

-"Fantasmas" tomarán Fiscalía General este lunes a las 10 am


Economía


-Crean fondo chino-venezolano para construir 20.000 viviendas


Empresas y Negocios


-"Centigon", nuevo nombre del líder mundial en seguridad


Finanzas al Día


-Seniat notificó reparos a petrolera West Falcon


Petróleo


-Citgo reportó dividendos por US$ 697 millones

-Total cambia con Shell participación en campos petroleros


Gran Caracas


-Alcaldía Metropolitana decreta alerta por constantes lluvias


Internacionales


-Líder del PAN afirma que Chávez es un "loco sin legitimidad"

-Fidel Castro: La CIA inventó versión del Mal de Parkinson

-México podría considerar romper relaciones con Venezuela

-Abogado de Rodrigo Granda fue herido en atentado

-EEUU afirma que democracia en Venezuela sigue deteriorándose

-Fuerte sismo de 6,8 grados sacude el norte de Chile

-Anuncian nuevos focos de gripe aviar en China e Indonesia

-Europa indignada por supuestos vuelos secretos de la CIA

-Condenan a profesor saudí a 750 latigazos por blasfemia

-Desalojan Congreso de Ecuador por marcha indígena

-Huelga paraliza el sistema de salud pública en Nicaragua

-Detenido historiador en Austria por negar el Holocausto

-Japón rechaza reunión bilateral con Perú en cumbre APEC
--
Cortesía de Cuba http://satelites.ath.cx
Escuche el Radio_Mambi
http://satelites.ath.cx/radiotv/Radio_Mambi.htm
Corrupcion_en_Cuba
http://www.cadal.org/libros/pdf/Corrupcion_en_Cuba.pdf
http://www.martinoticias.com/media/audio/M-001_051004.wma

--
Super User For Ever
2005-11-18 19:48:39 UTC
Permalink
Titulares Enema Global
(caca-caca-caca-caca-caca-caca-caca-caca....)
The Prison Puzzle

It's a terrifying thing when the people who devote their lives to
protecting our national security feel that the civilians who oversee
their operations are out of control.

It's maddening. Why does the Bush administration keep forcing policies
on the United States military that endanger Americans wearing the
nation's uniform - policies that the military does not want, that do not
work and that violate standards upheld by the civilized world for
decades?

When the Bush administration rewrote the rules for dealing with
prisoners after 9/11, needlessly scrapping the Geneva Conventions and
American law, it ignored the objections of lawyers for the armed
services. Now, heedless of the lessons of Abu Ghraib, the civilians are
once again running over the people in uniform. Tim Golden and Eric
Schmitt reported yesterday in The Times that the administration is
blocking the Pentagon from adopting the language of the Geneva
Conventions to set rules for handling prisoners in the so-called war on
terror.

Senior military lawyers want these standards, as do some Defense and
State Department officials outside the inner circle. They say the abuse
and torture of prisoners has reduced America's standing with its allies
and taken away its moral high ground with the rest of the world. They
also know that it endangers any American soldiers who are captured.

The rigid ideologues blocking this reform say the Geneva Conventions
banning inhumane treatment are too vague. Which part of no murder,
torture, mutilation, cruelty or humiliation do they not understand? The
restrictions are a problem only if you want to do such abhorrent things
and pretend they are legal. That is why the Bush administration tossed
out the rules after 9/11.

It's a terrifying thing when the people who devote their lives to
protecting our national security feel that the civilians who oversee
their operations are out of control. Dana Priest reports in The
Washington Post that even the Central Intelligence Agency's clandestine
operators are getting nervous about the network of secret prisons they
have around the world - including, of all places, at a Soviet-era
compound in Eastern Europe.

We're not naïve enough to believe that if the C.I.A. nabs a Qaeda
operative who knows where a ticking bomb is hidden, that terrorist will
emerge unbruised from his interrogation. Extraordinary circumstances are
different from general policies that allow foot soldiers and even
innocent bystanders to be swept up in messy, uncontrolled and probably
fruitless detentions. Ms. Priest reports that of the more than 100
prisoners sent by the C.I.A. to its "black site" camps, only 30 are
considered major terrorism suspects, and some have presumably been kept
so long that their information is out of date. The rest have limited
intelligence value, according to The Post, and many of them have been
subjected to the odious United States practice of shipping prisoners to
countries like Egypt, Jordan and Morocco and pretending that they won't
be tortured.

Like so many of the most distressing stories these days - the outing of
Valerie Wilson and questions about the intelligence on Iraq also come to
mind - this one circles right back to Vice President Dick Cheney's
office.

Mr. Cheney, a prime mover behind the attempts to legalize torture, is
now leading a back-room fight to block a measure passed by the Senate,
90 to 9, that would impose international standards and American laws on
the treatment of prisoners. Mr. Cheney wants a different version, one
that would make the C.I.A.'s camps legal, although still hidden, and
authorize the use of torture by intelligence agents. Mr. Bush is
threatening to veto the entire military budget over this issue.

When his right-hand man, Lewis Libby, resigned after being indicted on
charges relating to team Cheney's counterattack against Joseph Wilson,
Mr. Cheney replaced him with David Addington, who helped draft the
infamous legalized-torture memo of 2002. Mr. Addington is now blocking
or weakening proposed changes to the prison policies. The Times said he
had berated a Pentagon aide who had briefed him and Mr. Libby recently
on the draft of the new military standards for handling prisoners. (The
indictment of Mr. Libby said he had done the same thing to a C.I.A.
briefer in 2003 when agency officials questioned the intelligence on
Iraq.)

The Times reports that Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and the
national security adviser, Stephen Hadley, favor changing the detention
policies. So we can only conclude that President Bush has decided to
expend the minimal clout remaining to his beleaguered administration in
a fight to put the full faith and credit of the United States behind the
concept of torture. After all, the sign on Dick Cheney's door says he is
the vice president.
Super User For Ever
2005-11-18 20:07:11 UTC
Permalink
The Republican Rift
Issue of 2005-10-31
Posted 2005-10-24

This week in the magazine, Jeffrey Goldberg writes about Brent
Scowcroft, the national-security adviser under President George H. W.
Bush—and the former President’s best friend—who has been at odds
with the current Administration. Here, with Amy Davidson, Goldberg
discusses Scowcroft and the divide within the Republican party over
Iraq.

AMY DAVIDSON: Why is Brent Scowcroft worth writing about now? He’s
been out of government for some time.

JEFFREY GOLDBERG: For one thing, he’s a leading proponent of the
“realist” school of foreign-policy thinking, which stands in
opposition to the “transformationalist,” or neoconservative, or
liberal interventionist—pick your preference—school. He also has a
great deal of experience on the Iraqi question—he managed the first
Gulf War for President George H. W. Bush, so it’s interesting to hear
what he thinks of the current war. (Not much, as you can see from the
article.) And he’s the best friend of the father of the current
President, and the mentor of the current Secretary of State, so it’s
worth exploring why the Administration of George W. Bush doesn’t
listen to his advice on Iraq and other subjects.

Scowcroft is a consummate diplomat and a careful man. And yet, reading
the quotes in your story, it seems that he almost had to force himself
not to lash out at the current Administration—and he didn’t always
succeed. Is Scowcroft an angry man these days?

He’s a man in control of his emotions, and so I’m not sure how angry
he is, or how far he would be willing to go to show his anger. He is
upset about the course of the war, of course, and I suppose he’s upset
because his advice before the war was ignored. But I don’t think he
takes these things personally. I think he doesn’t want to see America
do damage to itself. And, according to what he told me, he thinks
America has been damaged by the intervention in Iraq: he believes, he
said, that the Iraq war has made our terrorism problem worse, not
better.

You mentioned his advice before the war. That advice was very public:
Scowcroft wrote an op-ed in the Wall Street Journal with the title
“Don’t Attack Saddam.” Does Scowcroft have any regrets about
that—either about the substance of the piece or about how openly
critical he was?

I don’t believe he has specific regrets. He very much wanted to
express these ideas privately, but had no means to do so. He is a very
unusual figure in Washington, in that he does not seem to seek
popularity or attention. But he seems to believe that when asked a
question he should answer honestly. (This, too, makes him unusual in
Washington.) He regrets not having a better relationship with George W.
Bush and his White House, but he’s not going to sacrifice principles
for access. (This, it is almost needless to say, makes him extremely
unusual in this city.)

Obviously, Scowcroft doesn’t think we should have gone into Iraq in
the first place. Is he also critical of how the war has been conducted?
Does he believe that it could have turned out better, had different
tactical decisions been made?

Scowcroft believes that Iraq was a sideshow to the war on terror, and
that America should have focussed its attention on resolving the dispute
between Israel and the Palestinians. Once the decision to go to war was
made, he supported it, but with deep trepidation. He doesn’t
specifically criticize the conduct of the war; what he says is that
American policymakers need to think through very carefully the
consequences of occupying Arab countries, which, he makes it clear, he
doesn’t think the Bush Administration did. He also suggests that this
might have been an impossible mission; as a realist, he is doubtful that
democracy can be imposed by force.

Scowcroft told you that Iraq was beginning to remind him of Vietnam. How
so?

He was very careful on this point: he said that Vietnam caused bitter
divisions in American society, and he has not seen that in the case of
Iraq. But he fears that we’re moving in that direction.

Scowcroft is George H. W. Bush’s best friend. What does it mean that
Scowcroft seems to disagree with his son?

It doesn’t mean anything for his relationship with the elder Bush.
They remain best friends. I’ve been told that Bush is sorry that his
son and his best friend aren’t close, and, according to people with
knowledge of this relationship, the elder Bush has tried to broker
meetings between his son and Scowcroft. But the deeper meaning here is
ideological: George W. Bush’s father was committed to a realist
understanding of foreign policy. This served him well in Iraq, and not
so well in Bosnia. George W. Bush, on the other hand, has become a
leading proponent of democratic transformationalism; he believes it is
America’s job to help non-democratic countries become democratic. The
realists don’t believe that the internal organization of another
country is any of our business; George W. Bush, evidently, does.

The relationship between Scowcroft and the Bushes is not the only
complicated one in this story. Condoleezza Rice was Scowcroft’s
protégée. What happened there?

Condoleezza Rice started her public career as an aide to Scowcroft, and
was firmly in the realist camp. But she switched Bushes, in a sense,
becoming closer to the son than to the father; the son has a different
view of the world, and now so does Rice. From what I understand, Rice
believes now that the realists’ preoccupation with stability over
democratic change brought us to September 11th, and now she’s
committed to the idea of transforming countries into democracies, rather
than dealing with their governments as they are. There is, of course,
merit to that argument. There is also merit to Scowcroft’s argument
that America shouldn’t rush into these sorts of programs haphazardly.

I was also struck by Scowcroft’s comment to you about Vice-President
Cheney: “I consider Cheney a good friend—I’ve known him for thirty
years. But Dick Cheney I don’t know anymore.” What does that say
about Cheney’s role in the White House now?

It implies two things. One, the people who served George H. W. Bush
cannot believe that their former colleague—the deeply conservative
Secretary of Defense in that first Bush Administration—has embraced
the neoconservative, transformationalist philosophy of George W. Bush.
It also suggests something about the estrangement of the camp of George
H. W. Bush from the camp of George W. Bush.

Some of the bad feeling between Scowcroft and his colleagues and the
members of the current Bush Administration seems to stem from differing
interpretations of the first Gulf War. How does each side see it?

George H. W. Bush made a decision not to invade Baghdad in 1991, and not
to support the uprising of Shiites and Kurds at the end of the Gulf War.
He was guided in this decision by his allies, and by the United Nations,
which set as a goal the removal of Iraq from Kuwait, not the removal of
Saddam from Iraq.

But for a long time he was criticized for this, particularly by the
people who came to be known as neoconservatives. They said that he
“didn’t finish the job.” The people associated with George W. Bush
wanted very much to “finish the job.” Now, of course, George H. W.
Bush’s decision, back in 1991, looks to many people prudent, rather
than merely timid.

In doing the reporting for this article, did you get a sense of how the
decision-making process in the White House works, and how it differs
from that in the past two Administrations?

One big difference, as far as I can tell, is the unwillingness of many
people in the second Bush Administration to listen to dissenting
analyses. Scowcroft always made sure that George H. W. Bush heard all
sides of an argument—good potential outcomes, bad potential outcomes.

People wonder whether Scowcroft is a proxy for the elder Bush. But is he
also a proxy for a broader constituency—a wing of the Republican Party
that is increasingly disaffected by the war?

Only Scowcroft and the elder Bush could say whether Scowcroft is
Bush’s proxy on matters related to Iraq, and neither man is saying. On
the larger question, yes, Scowcroft speaks for the non-neoconservative,
non-evangelical, non-human-rights wing of the Republican Party—the
business side of the Party.

Scowcroft, you write, is a “realist”—though he would qualify the
term—and a number of those who made the case for invading Iraq were
“idealists.” What do those terms mean, in this context?

One way to put it is that the realists didn’t go after Saddam, because
it didn’t seem tenable. The idealists went after him, because he’s
such a loathsome man. The great shortcoming of realism is its disregard
for human rights—well, not disregard, precisely, but the belief
embedded in realism that what countries do to their own people
shouldn’t be our strategic concern. Now, of course, the realists feel
that events on the ground in Iraq vindicate their views. The idealists
say that it is too early to tell, and that “stability” in the Middle
East—the thing the realists want—brought us to this current mess.

How well does the realist-idealist split reflect the debate that
preceded the war? Two and a half years ago, much of the talk was about
the doctrine of preëmption—which doesn’t neatly fall into either
category.

Preëmption is not necessarily an idealistic notion; a realist could
very well argue for preëmption. I believe that Dick Cheney would put
himself in this camp—the camp of people who were less interested in
bringing democracy to Iraq as a means of permanently making the place
stable, but who saw in Saddam a rising threat and felt it necessary to
do something.

Whether we should go to war to spread democracy is a good question—one
that, as you note, we’ve debated as a nation since Woodrow Wilson. But
is that, in fact, why we went to war?

Again, a mystery. I think that there were many reasons for this war,
even in the mind of George W. Bush. I think each key player in the
Administration had a different reason for wanting this. I tend to think
that we went to war because most people thought Saddam was a provably
dangerous man who was hiding a W.M.D. program. I tend to think that
Bush’s second inaugural—the one in which he called for an end to
tyranny—would not have happened had the American military found ten
pounds of Iraqi anthrax in a bunker somewhere. This is a roundabout way
of saying that democratic reform is the reason we have now for the war,
because W.M.D.s weren’t found.

Are the conservatives turning against the neoconservatives?

They’ve been doing so for some time. Just read George Will. Their
complaint is that neoconservatives aren’t conservative; they’re
liberals with guns. Conservatives tend to take Scowcroft’s more
jaundiced view of human nature. Paul Wolfowitz, on the other hand, is a
liberal, but a liberal who believes that transformation can be brought
about by force, not just persuasion. Obviously, there are other breaches
within the Republican Party, on the Harriet Miers nomination, on
spending, and on and on.

Is Scowcroft at all optimistic about what’s likely to happen next in
Iraq?

He is not terribly optimistic. He feels very heavily the weight of
history, and history isn’t telling him that things will turn out well.
He’s hoping they will, I believe, and, from what I can tell, this is a
sincere hope, even if a good turn of events in Iraq would prove him
wrong in his analysis. This is an eighty-year-old man who wants to see
his country safe and secure and prosperous. I’m not sure he’s right,
of course—sometimes the realists overestimate the difficulties that
come with change. But I think it’s fair to say that the country would
be better off if Scowcroft was at least heard out by the current
Administration.

http://www.newyorker.com/online/content/articles/051031on_onlineonly01
Super User For Ever
2005-11-18 20:15:21 UTC
Permalink
Amarga derrota para Bush

Tiempos dificiles para George W. Bush: En la casa de representantes
le negaron, incluso la gente de su partido, cortes draconicos en
el campo social. Ademas anuncion el fuerte aliado Corea del Sur
sorpresivamente un retiro masivo de sus soldados de Irak.

(Aqui corto, pues estoy seguro que la enema de noticias de la
mariconi nos informara en detalle del debacle....)
Super User For Ever
2005-11-18 20:36:47 UTC
Permalink
YO ESTOY SEGURA QUE SI YO LLEGO A JODER A CUBA ALCANZAREMOS
AQUI EL NIVEL DEL PUEBLO HERMANO DE LA REP. DOMINICANA, QUE
Y NI SIQUIERA APARECE EN LA LISTA....


Definition: Gold medals won at the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games. Per capita
figures expressed per 1 million population.

1. Bahamas, The 3.3 gold medals per 1 millio
2. Slovenia 1.0 gold medals per 1 millio
3. Cuba 1.0 gold medals per 1 millio <----------
4. Norway 0.9 gold medals per 1 millio
5. Hungary 0.8 gold medals per 1 millio

28. United Kingdom 0.2 gold medals per 1 millio
29. Germany 0.2 gold medals per 1 millio
30. Poland 0.2 gold medals per 1 millio
31. United States 0.1 gold medals per 1 millio
32. Switzerland 0.1 gold medals per 1 millio
33. Canada 0.1 gold medals per 1 millio

Source: International Olympic Committee
Nancy R2
2005-11-20 16:39:49 UTC
Permalink
Es un mal momento para visitar a Chávez, según los analistas
 
Inconveniencias del viaje presidencial
 
Más allá de convenios económicos y alianzas políticas, de ayuda
financiera y provisión energética, de amistades y promesas, se lo
mire por donde se lo mire, no es un buen momento para que el presidente
Néstor Kirchner viaje a Venezuela.
Esa es la opinión de varios analistas de política internacional a
los que consultó LA NACION, para conocer su mirada sobre la visita que
hoy iniciará el mandatario argentino a su par venezolano, Hugo
Chávez.
"Kirchner realiza este viaje quizá por muy buenas razones, pero en el
momento inapropiado", sintetizó Juan Tokatlian, director del
Departamento de Relaciones Internacionales de la Universidad de San
Andrés.
Para el experto, hay que considerar tres cuestiones para llegar a esta
conclusión. La primera es que la relación del Gobierno con Venezuela
tuvo hasta ahora "más componentes prácticos y económicos que
políticos", donde ese país se convirtió en referente del proyecto
de reindustrialización de la Casa Rosada.
A pesar de ello, para Tokatlian no se puede dejar de atender el segundo
elemento, y es que esa visita llega luego de que Chávez calificara a
George W. Bush de "asesino genocida" y "loco", y de que el secretario
adjunto para América latina del Departamento de Estado norteamericano,
Tom Shannon, definiera la relación con Venezuela como "de riesgo".
Además, se produce en el momento de máxima tensión de las
relaciones bilaterales entre Venezuela y México.
Esto ayuda a analizar la tercera cuestión que planteó Tokatlian, y
es que, aunque el Gobierno trató de presentarla como una visita
tripartita, [el presidente de Brasil] "Lula da Silva no sale de su
país por la crisis, pero menos para abrazarse con Chávez, justo
cuando busca dar señales positivas al mercado".
"Comprar la pelea"
Para Julio Cirino, analista internacional, el viaje que hoy emprende
Kirchner puede tener dos motivaciones. La primera es económica, "para
hacer negocios", vinculados sobre todo con la provisión de gas y la
compra de gasoil, y la segunda es política.
"Si buscan armar un eje La Habana-Caracas-Buenos Aires, tiene sentido la
invitación a Lula, y también que él se haya negado", opinó
Cirino.
Sin embargo, Cirino se sumó a la opinión generalizada de que es el
peor momento para viajar a Venezuela, dada la pelea que Chávez
mantiene con los líderes del continente.
"Si justo cuando Chávez elige una confrontación con EE.UU. voy a su
país en un acto de solidaridad, me compro su pelea", concluyó el
analista.
También crítico con la decisión presidencial, Andrés Cisneros,
vicecanciller durante los 90, opinó que la visita es coherente con una
política exterior "muy cargada de ideología y en la que Kirchner
prioriza obtener el apoyo de determinado sector electoral antes que la
identificación del interés nacional".
Cisneros agregó que "después de desperdiciar la IV Cumbre de las
Américas -a diferencia de Brasil-, el primer viaje del Presidente es a
Venezuela, luego de que Chávez convocara en Mar del Plata al entierro
del capitalismo y el resurgimiento del socialismo". Y consideró,
tajante, que uno de los elementos de identificación política más
antiguo del mundo "pasa por las compañías que elegimos".
Link corto: http://www.lanacion.com.ar/757934
 
Nancy R2
2005-11-20 16:39:55 UTC
Permalink
Es un mal momento para visitar a Chávez, según los analistas
 
Inconveniencias del viaje presidencial
 
Más allá de convenios económicos y alianzas políticas, de ayuda
financiera y provisión energética, de amistades y promesas, se lo
mire por donde se lo mire, no es un buen momento para que el presidente
Néstor Kirchner viaje a Venezuela.
Esa es la opinión de varios analistas de política internacional a
los que consultó LA NACION, para conocer su mirada sobre la visita que
hoy iniciará el mandatario argentino a su par venezolano, Hugo
Chávez.
"Kirchner realiza este viaje quizá por muy buenas razones, pero en el
momento inapropiado", sintetizó Juan Tokatlian, director del
Departamento de Relaciones Internacionales de la Universidad de San
Andrés.
Para el experto, hay que considerar tres cuestiones para llegar a esta
conclusión. La primera es que la relación del Gobierno con Venezuela
tuvo hasta ahora "más componentes prácticos y económicos que
políticos", donde ese país se convirtió en referente del proyecto
de reindustrialización de la Casa Rosada.
A pesar de ello, para Tokatlian no se puede dejar de atender el segundo
elemento, y es que esa visita llega luego de que Chávez calificara a
George W. Bush de "asesino genocida" y "loco", y de que el secretario
adjunto para América latina del Departamento de Estado norteamericano,
Tom Shannon, definiera la relación con Venezuela como "de riesgo".
Además, se produce en el momento de máxima tensión de las
relaciones bilaterales entre Venezuela y México.
Esto ayuda a analizar la tercera cuestión que planteó Tokatlian, y
es que, aunque el Gobierno trató de presentarla como una visita
tripartita, [el presidente de Brasil] "Lula da Silva no sale de su
país por la crisis, pero menos para abrazarse con Chávez, justo
cuando busca dar señales positivas al mercado".
"Comprar la pelea"
Para Julio Cirino, analista internacional, el viaje que hoy emprende
Kirchner puede tener dos motivaciones. La primera es económica, "para
hacer negocios", vinculados sobre todo con la provisión de gas y la
compra de gasoil, y la segunda es política.
"Si buscan armar un eje La Habana-Caracas-Buenos Aires, tiene sentido la
invitación a Lula, y también que él se haya negado", opinó
Cirino.
Sin embargo, Cirino se sumó a la opinión generalizada de que es el
peor momento para viajar a Venezuela, dada la pelea que Chávez
mantiene con los líderes del continente.
"Si justo cuando Chávez elige una confrontación con EE.UU. voy a su
país en un acto de solidaridad, me compro su pelea", concluyó el
analista.
También crítico con la decisión presidencial, Andrés Cisneros,
vicecanciller durante los 90, opinó que la visita es coherente con una
política exterior "muy cargada de ideología y en la que Kirchner
prioriza obtener el apoyo de determinado sector electoral antes que la
identificación del interés nacional".
Cisneros agregó que "después de desperdiciar la IV Cumbre de las
Américas -a diferencia de Brasil-, el primer viaje del Presidente es a
Venezuela, luego de que Chávez convocara en Mar del Plata al entierro
del capitalismo y el resurgimiento del socialismo". Y consideró,
tajante, que uno de los elementos de identificación política más
antiguo del mundo "pasa por las compañías que elegimos".
Link corto: http://www.lanacion.com.ar/757934
 
Nancy R2
2005-11-20 16:40:00 UTC
Permalink
Es un mal momento para visitar a Chávez, según los analistas
 
Inconveniencias del viaje presidencial
 
Más allá de convenios económicos y alianzas políticas, de ayuda
financiera y provisión energética, de amistades y promesas, se lo
mire por donde se lo mire, no es un buen momento para que el presidente
Néstor Kirchner viaje a Venezuela.
Esa es la opinión de varios analistas de política internacional a
los que consultó LA NACION, para conocer su mirada sobre la visita que
hoy iniciará el mandatario argentino a su par venezolano, Hugo
Chávez.
"Kirchner realiza este viaje quizá por muy buenas razones, pero en el
momento inapropiado", sintetizó Juan Tokatlian, director del
Departamento de Relaciones Internacionales de la Universidad de San
Andrés.
Para el experto, hay que considerar tres cuestiones para llegar a esta
conclusión. La primera es que la relación del Gobierno con Venezuela
tuvo hasta ahora "más componentes prácticos y económicos que
políticos", donde ese país se convirtió en referente del proyecto
de reindustrialización de la Casa Rosada.
A pesar de ello, para Tokatlian no se puede dejar de atender el segundo
elemento, y es que esa visita llega luego de que Chávez calificara a
George W. Bush de "asesino genocida" y "loco", y de que el secretario
adjunto para América latina del Departamento de Estado norteamericano,
Tom Shannon, definiera la relación con Venezuela como "de riesgo".
Además, se produce en el momento de máxima tensión de las
relaciones bilaterales entre Venezuela y México.
Esto ayuda a analizar la tercera cuestión que planteó Tokatlian, y
es que, aunque el Gobierno trató de presentarla como una visita
tripartita, [el presidente de Brasil] "Lula da Silva no sale de su
país por la crisis, pero menos para abrazarse con Chávez, justo
cuando busca dar señales positivas al mercado".
"Comprar la pelea"
Para Julio Cirino, analista internacional, el viaje que hoy emprende
Kirchner puede tener dos motivaciones. La primera es económica, "para
hacer negocios", vinculados sobre todo con la provisión de gas y la
compra de gasoil, y la segunda es política.
"Si buscan armar un eje La Habana-Caracas-Buenos Aires, tiene sentido la
invitación a Lula, y también que él se haya negado", opinó
Cirino.
Sin embargo, Cirino se sumó a la opinión generalizada de que es el
peor momento para viajar a Venezuela, dada la pelea que Chávez
mantiene con los líderes del continente.
"Si justo cuando Chávez elige una confrontación con EE.UU. voy a su
país en un acto de solidaridad, me compro su pelea", concluyó el
analista.
También crítico con la decisión presidencial, Andrés Cisneros,
vicecanciller durante los 90, opinó que la visita es coherente con una
política exterior "muy cargada de ideología y en la que Kirchner
prioriza obtener el apoyo de determinado sector electoral antes que la
identificación del interés nacional".
Cisneros agregó que "después de desperdiciar la IV Cumbre de las
Américas -a diferencia de Brasil-, el primer viaje del Presidente es a
Venezuela, luego de que Chávez convocara en Mar del Plata al entierro
del capitalismo y el resurgimiento del socialismo". Y consideró,
tajante, que uno de los elementos de identificación política más
antiguo del mundo "pasa por las compañías que elegimos".
Link corto: http://www.lanacion.com.ar/757934
 
Nancy R2
2005-11-20 16:40:32 UTC
Permalink
Es un mal momento para visitar a Chávez, según los analistas
 
Inconveniencias del viaje presidencial
 
Más allá de convenios económicos y alianzas políticas, de ayuda
financiera y provisión energética, de amistades y promesas, se lo
mire por donde se lo mire, no es un buen momento para que el presidente
Néstor Kirchner viaje a Venezuela.
Esa es la opinión de varios analistas de política internacional a
los que consultó LA NACION, para conocer su mirada sobre la visita que
hoy iniciará el mandatario argentino a su par venezolano, Hugo
Chávez.
"Kirchner realiza este viaje quizá por muy buenas razones, pero en el
momento inapropiado", sintetizó Juan Tokatlian, director del
Departamento de Relaciones Internacionales de la Universidad de San
Andrés.
Para el experto, hay que considerar tres cuestiones para llegar a esta
conclusión. La primera es que la relación del Gobierno con Venezuela
tuvo hasta ahora "más componentes prácticos y económicos que
políticos", donde ese país se convirtió en referente del proyecto
de reindustrialización de la Casa Rosada.
A pesar de ello, para Tokatlian no se puede dejar de atender el segundo
elemento, y es que esa visita llega luego de que Chávez calificara a
George W. Bush de "asesino genocida" y "loco", y de que el secretario
adjunto para América latina del Departamento de Estado norteamericano,
Tom Shannon, definiera la relación con Venezuela como "de riesgo".
Además, se produce en el momento de máxima tensión de las
relaciones bilaterales entre Venezuela y México.
Esto ayuda a analizar la tercera cuestión que planteó Tokatlian, y
es que, aunque el Gobierno trató de presentarla como una visita
tripartita, [el presidente de Brasil] "Lula da Silva no sale de su
país por la crisis, pero menos para abrazarse con Chávez, justo
cuando busca dar señales positivas al mercado".
"Comprar la pelea"
Para Julio Cirino, analista internacional, el viaje que hoy emprende
Kirchner puede tener dos motivaciones. La primera es económica, "para
hacer negocios", vinculados sobre todo con la provisión de gas y la
compra de gasoil, y la segunda es política.
"Si buscan armar un eje La Habana-Caracas-Buenos Aires, tiene sentido la
invitación a Lula, y también que él se haya negado", opinó
Cirino.
Sin embargo, Cirino se sumó a la opinión generalizada de que es el
peor momento para viajar a Venezuela, dada la pelea que Chávez
mantiene con los líderes del continente.
"Si justo cuando Chávez elige una confrontación con EE.UU. voy a su
país en un acto de solidaridad, me compro su pelea", concluyó el
analista.
También crítico con la decisión presidencial, Andrés Cisneros,
vicecanciller durante los 90, opinó que la visita es coherente con una
política exterior "muy cargada de ideología y en la que Kirchner
prioriza obtener el apoyo de determinado sector electoral antes que la
identificación del interés nacional".
Cisneros agregó que "después de desperdiciar la IV Cumbre de las
Américas -a diferencia de Brasil-, el primer viaje del Presidente es a
Venezuela, luego de que Chávez convocara en Mar del Plata al entierro
del capitalismo y el resurgimiento del socialismo". Y consideró,
tajante, que uno de los elementos de identificación política más
antiguo del mundo "pasa por las compañías que elegimos".
Link corto: http://www.lanacion.com.ar/757934
 
Nancy R2
2005-11-20 16:50:16 UTC
Permalink
Insulza critica que Hugo Chávez haya difundido videos sobre
negociaciones privadas
Miércoles 16 de Noviembre de 2005
15:44 
DPA
WASHINGTON.- El secretario general de la Organización de Estados
Americanos (OEA), José Miguel Insulza, criticó hoy que el Presidente
de Venezuela, Hugo Chávez, haya difundido videos de una negociación
a puertas cerradas entre los jefes de Estado y de gobierno en la IV
Cumbre de las Américas, que tuvo lugar este mes en Mar del Plata,
Argentina.
"Creo que todos los participantes deben ser informados previamente si
(el debate) va a ser privado o va a ser público", dijo Insulza, en
respuesta a consultas sobre la decisión del Mandatario venezolano.
Interrogado por la prensa sobre si en esta ocasión los participantes
habían sido informados de que esta reunión iba a ser divulgada en
videos, Insulza respondió: "No lo sé, entiendo que no. Por lo menos
yo no fui informado".
Insulza fue uno de los participantes de las reuniones a puertas cerradas
de la Cumbre de Mar del Plata, en que los Mandatarios debatieron si el
Acuerdo de Libre Comercio de las Américas (ALCA) debía formar parte
de la declaración final o no, y cuya filmación Chávez comenzó a
divulgar el fin de semana último en su programa "Aló Presidente".
"El rol de la OEA se ha ido incrementando desde la Cumbre de 1994, pero
nosotros no estábamos a cargo ni de la seguridad ni de las
comunicaciones. Son los organizadores de la cumbre los que están a
cargo de ese punto", apuntó Insulza, para explicar por qué no
podía estar seguro de cómo sucedió todo.
En todo caso, dijo que no cree "que el asunto tenga la gravedad que se
la ha dado".
Por su parte, el embajador de Argentina ante la OEA, Rodolfo Gil, dijo
que su gobierno no sabe cómo Chávez tuvo acceso a los videos.
"No sabemos cómo el Presidente Chávez obtuvo los videos. Pero
estamos aquí haciendo un esfuerzo para discutir temas importantes,
así que no voy a hacer más comentarios", dijo Gil, durante un panel
acerca de la IV Cumbre que tuvo lugar en la Universidad George
Washington.
La OEA no intervendrá en crisis México-Venezuela
En cuanto a la polémica entre Chávez y el Presidente de México,
Vicente Fox, y el deterioro de las relaciones entre esos dos países,
Insulza dijo que la OEA no va a opinar ni a mediar.
"Nosotros nunca vamos a discutir problemas bilaterales, eso sí que
nunca", dijo Insulza hablando en nombre de la organización continental
que lidera.
"Absolutamente no", insistió. "Nosotros nunca nos vamos a involucrar
en temas bilaterales, a menos que los dos países lo soliciten.
Nosotros estamos trabajando en temas bilaterales pero ha sido a pedido
de ambos gobiernos. Cualquiera que sea el tema, nosotros no nos vamos a
involucrar en temas bilaterales".

EL MERCURIO ONLINE DE CHILE
   
Nancy R2
2005-11-20 16:50:44 UTC
Permalink
Insulza critica que Hugo Chávez haya difundido videos sobre
negociaciones privadas
Miércoles 16 de Noviembre de 2005
15:44 
DPA
WASHINGTON.- El secretario general de la Organización de Estados
Americanos (OEA), José Miguel Insulza, criticó hoy que el Presidente
de Venezuela, Hugo Chávez, haya difundido videos de una negociación
a puertas cerradas entre los jefes de Estado y de gobierno en la IV
Cumbre de las Américas, que tuvo lugar este mes en Mar del Plata,
Argentina.
"Creo que todos los participantes deben ser informados previamente si
(el debate) va a ser privado o va a ser público", dijo Insulza, en
respuesta a consultas sobre la decisión del Mandatario venezolano.
Interrogado por la prensa sobre si en esta ocasión los participantes
habían sido informados de que esta reunión iba a ser divulgada en
videos, Insulza respondió: "No lo sé, entiendo que no. Por lo menos
yo no fui informado".
Insulza fue uno de los participantes de las reuniones a puertas cerradas
de la Cumbre de Mar del Plata, en que los Mandatarios debatieron si el
Acuerdo de Libre Comercio de las Américas (ALCA) debía formar parte
de la declaración final o no, y cuya filmación Chávez comenzó a
divulgar el fin de semana último en su programa "Aló Presidente".
"El rol de la OEA se ha ido incrementando desde la Cumbre de 1994, pero
nosotros no estábamos a cargo ni de la seguridad ni de las
comunicaciones. Son los organizadores de la cumbre los que están a
cargo de ese punto", apuntó Insulza, para explicar por qué no
podía estar seguro de cómo sucedió todo.
En todo caso, dijo que no cree "que el asunto tenga la gravedad que se
la ha dado".
Por su parte, el embajador de Argentina ante la OEA, Rodolfo Gil, dijo
que su gobierno no sabe cómo Chávez tuvo acceso a los videos.
"No sabemos cómo el Presidente Chávez obtuvo los videos. Pero
estamos aquí haciendo un esfuerzo para discutir temas importantes,
así que no voy a hacer más comentarios", dijo Gil, durante un panel
acerca de la IV Cumbre que tuvo lugar en la Universidad George
Washington.
La OEA no intervendrá en crisis México-Venezuela
En cuanto a la polémica entre Chávez y el Presidente de México,
Vicente Fox, y el deterioro de las relaciones entre esos dos países,
Insulza dijo que la OEA no va a opinar ni a mediar.
"Nosotros nunca vamos a discutir problemas bilaterales, eso sí que
nunca", dijo Insulza hablando en nombre de la organización continental
que lidera.
"Absolutamente no", insistió. "Nosotros nunca nos vamos a involucrar
en temas bilaterales, a menos que los dos países lo soliciten.
Nosotros estamos trabajando en temas bilaterales pero ha sido a pedido
de ambos gobiernos. Cualquiera que sea el tema, nosotros no nos vamos a
involucrar en temas bilaterales".

EL MERCURIO ONLINE DE CHILE
   

Loading...